6 Etiquette Rules for Giving Wedding Gifts

Hello, beauties! I hope you all had a wonderful Easter and indulged in plenty of chocolate.

Spring gets me into a wedding mood. The sun is out, birds are singing and people are getting over their winter blues. If you are starting to get wedding invitations, you may be facing the big question… What gift am I going to buy for this happy couple?

If you follow these six simple rules, you’ll be sure to give a gift the bride and groom will definitely smile about.

Visit their registry
Most couples have an online registry somewhere on the web. This is usually set up through a store’s website they like. Basically, it’s a wedding wishlist and when items are bought off of it, it will be removed from the list. So, don’t worry, you won’t be buying something someone else already got them. If you decide to buy something off the list, it’s a no-brainer they will like it!

Kitchen, bed and bath
The bride and groom are getting ready to spend the rest of their lives together, so why not get them some new things for their home. Chances are, a lot of the stuff they have are things that came from their apartments when they were single. I’m sure they would appreciate a matching dish set! Or, you could get them something they would never spend the money on for themselves, like a pair of high thread-count hotel towels.

Spend 50 plus
I was always told to use the price-per-plate as a measurement of how much money you should give. So, typically that’s around $50. However, I now disagree with this. If you are going to a high-class wedding one weekend, and the next weekend you’re going to more of a BBQ-type-wedding, you shouldn’t give a less expensive gift.

Cash
I know we talked about how much you should give, but giving money as a gift is becoming more and more acceptable. If the couple is already living together it may be a good idea to give them cash since they may already have everything they need for their home. The newlyweds may want some extra money for their honeymoon too! If you’re giving money instead of a gift, here’s a ballpark on what you should be aiming for.
Co-worker: $50
Friend or Relative: $75
Close friend or close relative: $100

Give a group gift
Ask a group of wedding guests that you know to chip in for a nice little getaway for the happy newlyweds. Another idea, if they have an item on their registry that is way out of your price range, but you know they will love, ask some other people to pitch in.

An Excursion
Give the couple a gift certificate for something fun to do. Maybe something they would never think of doing, like scuba diving lessons, horseback riding, or a pottery class. Or, give them a certificate for a spa day, or a wine or brewery tour! This will stick around in their memory as one of the first activities they did as a married couple.

This guideline will help you give the newlyweds an appropriate gift. The main thing you need to do is set your budget, and plan the gift from there. I know it can seem confusing with all the do’s and don’ts but if it’s a heartfelt gift I’m sure the bride and groom will love it.

At the end of the day, don’t stress about a wedding gift. Give what you can. Remember, you were invited because you’re an important person to the couple, so you showing up is what they wanted most.

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